Trump Under Fire Over Syria Evacuation: The Complexities of Funding Proxy Fighters Tied to the Terrorist Kurdish Workers Party

One thing is certain regarding President Trump’s decision to remove America’s troops from Syria: whatever offensive Turkey plans against forces tied to the communist Kurdish Workers Party terrorist organization PKK in northern Syria, it will reflect somehow on Trump’s legacy with respect to foreign policy if the operation results in a broader regional conflict. Out of 1,000 military advisers located in the region, only 50 were located at the border. Given Turkey will likely deploy thousands of troops into the area, it is unlikely that 1,000 advisers, let alone 50 of our servicemen located at the border, could stop a sudden attack by Turkey deeper into Syria. For those not aware, the PKK has been classified a ‘Foreign Terrorist Organization’ by the State Department since October 8, 1997. In a larger sense, our foreign policy in Syria has been to illegally fund terrorists tied to Al-Qaeda to fight both the Assad regime in Syria. It was this policy which ultimately led to the creation of what is today the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. To defeat them, we funded a communist terror organization.

The Russo-Turkish Rivalry: Prelude to a Third World War?

The Russo-Turkish rivalry is not new, nor is Syria’s ties to both Russia and Turkey and before that, the progenitor of both nations, the Roman Empire (both in Rome itself and later, Constantinople). It emerged in 1676 over Moscow’s thirst to establish a warm-water port on the Black Sea, in Crimea, as well as the region comprising of modern Ukraine west of the Dnieper River, and would follow with conflicts in 1688 and 1689. Though these early conflicts ended in defeat for the Russians, by the war of 1695–96, Tsar Peter the Great’s forces successfully captured the fortress of Azov. It was here the Russian Empire’s design for territorial expansion to provide additional buffer zones and sea lanes into the Mediterranean by way of the Bosporus Strait (dividing Constantinople and Europe from Anatolia) began and, by 1878, ended with the Ottoman Empire on the brink of total imperial collapse. The rivalry, even after the two empires’ collapsed following World War I, remains alive and well, and on the brink of war over the civil war in Syria, and a potential confrontation with NATO.

A Full Point-by-Point Analysis of the Iran Nuclear Deal

The Iran Deal was almost certainly designed by Moscow and Tehran to extort the U.S. and NATO allies under threat of world war while empowering the member nations of BRICS (Russia, China, Brazil, India and South Africa) to facilitate both its expansion into Central Asia as well as Iran’s potential membership, which by proxy would include its chain of vassal states (Syria, Lebanon and Yemen).

Europe’s ‘Powder Keg’ is Still Ignited by ‘An Executioner of His Own People’

No doubt the historical record will again be revised to cast blame on one group or the other, but not the responsible actor. As Winston Churchill noted, “History is written by the winners.” Like of Yugoslav giants of lore such as Chetnik general Draža Mihailović, communist dictator Josef Broz Tito and Serbian genocidal warlord Slobodan Milošević who have risen and fallen, the 140 year old warning by Bismarck of ‘some damn foolish thing in the Balkans’ will continue prompting winners — a new ‘Black Hand’ serving as ‘the executioner of his own people’ who will ‘set the whole thing off in the Balkans’ — to to add new chapters into European history textbooks littering future homecomings through blood and soil in Sarajevo.

Burying “Songbird” McCain

John Sidney McCain, who at 80 years old battles terminal brain cancer, remains an empty-suit political maverick whose failed 2008 presidential bid could be explained either by his ignorance or incompetence of/at grasping basic economic principles; his misfortune to run as the GOP’s sacrificial lamb against the rising star, Barack Obama, following the disastrous presidency…

A History of the Russo-Syrian Alliance

The history of Russian Middle East foreign policy with respect to Syria traces back to the pivotal reign of Ivan III (Ivan the Great), who selected the Eastern Orthodox Church at Constantinople to legitimize the royal line’s rule by divine right upon his arranged marriage to the niece of Byzantium’s last emperor, Zoë (Sophia) Paleologue. The Turks of Anatolia…