The Roman-Jewish Wars, Part One: Nero Caesar and the Zealot Revolt, 54 AD – 73 AD

As a result of worshiping the old Jewish faith according to the tefillin, the three-pronged Hebrew letter ‘sin’, having ceased to hold relevance — for the number in gematria for ‘man’ is ‘6’, and the Jews, since the 1st century, have been worshiping three men (Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob) as opposed to the Lord Jesus according to the decree of the self-proclaimed ‘messiah’ Nero Caesar (‘666’) — resulted in the ‘abomination that causes desolation’ described in the Book of Daniel, Matthew 24:15, and Mark 13:14. And because Jesus is God (John 17:3), is represented by the number ‘7’ and ‘777’, we, as disciples of Christ, are “to go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.” (Matthew 28:19)

The World Since the Fall of Rome and Constantinople, Part One: Building the Beasts of the Earth and Sea, 62 AD – 1453 AD

Despite the formation of the union, Western military assistance to Constantinople proved decisively ultimately insufficient, and on May 29, 1453, Constantinople fell to the Islamic Ottoman Turks. The union signed at Florence was never accepted by most Eastern Churches. Perhaps the council’s most important historical legacy were the lectures on Greek classical literature by many of the delegates from Constantinople which greatly reintroduced the West to the ancient customs of Antiquity, a set the tone for the coming era of Renaissance humanism. All this translates to 962 AD, when the papacy had become irreparably corrupt. The new Holy Roman Empire spelled the end to Roman imperial rule in Italy after 200 years of Constantinople’s increasingly weakened position. After 420 years of relative peace beginning with the Edict of Thessalonica in 380 AD, the coronation of Charlemagne as the first ‘King of the Romans’ in 800 AD ended the honeymoon period of the early Church, and by 1054 AD, the East-West Split between Latin Rome and Greek Constantinople officially divided the Latin and Greek churches. In any case, the seed of the Beast system planted through Charlemagne’s coronation as ‘King of the Romans’ would, by 1453, be fully in place, marking the end of the Middle Ages and transition into the more secular Renaissance. By 1517 when Martin Luther nailed his Ninety-Five theses to the door of his Wittenburg monastery, the Beast system, for the first time under serious threat, mobilized along partisan lines to destroy the Protestant reformers through wars and purges that would kill millions of Christians.